A La Recherche du Temps Perdu, or As Time Goes By: Where Does the Time Go in a Reading Tutor That Listens?

  • Jack Mostow
  • Greg Aist
  • Joseph Beck
  • Raghuvee Chalasani
  • Andrew Cuneo
  • Peng Jia
  • Krishna Kadaru
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2363)

Abstract

Analyzing the time allocation of students’ activities in a school-deployed mixed initiative tutor can be illuminating but surprisingly tricky. We discuss some complementary methods that we have used to understand how tutoring time is spent, such as analyzing sample videotaped sessions by hand, and querying a database generated from session logs. We identify issues, methods, and lessons that may be relevant to other tutors. One theme is that iterative design of “non-tutoring” components can enhance a tutor’s effectiveness, not by improved teaching, but by reducing the time wasted on non-learning activities. Another is that it is possible to relate student’s time allocation to improvements in various outcome measures.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Mostow
    • 2
  • Greg Aist
    • 2
  • Joseph Beck
    • 2
  • Raghuvee Chalasani
    • 2
  • Andrew Cuneo
    • 2
  • Peng Jia
    • 2
  • Krishna Kadaru
    • 2
  1. 1.Ames Research CenterRIACS, NASAMoffett Field
  2. 2.Project LISTENCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburgh

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