Sync/Trans: Simultaneous Machine Interpretation between English and Japanese

  • Shigeki Matsubara
  • Katsuhiko Toyama
  • Yasuyoshi Inagaki
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1747)

Abstract

This paper describes Sync/Trans, an incremental spoken language translation system. The system has been being developed for efficiently translating a spontaneous speech dialogue between an English speaker and a Japanese speaker. Its purpose being to behave as a simultaneous interpreter, the system produces the target output synchronously with the source input. Sync/Trans has the following features: (1) the system consists of modules that work in a synchronous fashion, (2) the system translates the source language possibly word-by-word according to the appearance order, (3) the system utilizes grammatically ill-formed expressions for the speech output, and (4) the system corrects the grammatical ill-formed expressions for the speech input at a pretty early stage. An experimental system for translating English speech into Japanese speech has been implemented. A few experimental results have shown Sync/Trans to be a promising system for simultaneous interpretation.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeki Matsubara
    • 1
  • Katsuhiko Toyama
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yasuyoshi Inagaki
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Language and CultureNagoya UniversityNagoya
  2. 2.Department of Computational Science and EngineeeringNagoya UniversityNagoya
  3. 3.Center for Integrated Acoustic Information ResearchNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan

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