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Gesture Recognition for Visually Mediated Interaction

  • A. Jonathan Howell
  • Hilary Buxton
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1739)

Abstract

This paper reports initial research on supporting Visually Mediated Interaction (VMI) by developing person-specific and generic gesture models for the control of active cameras.We describe a time-delay variant of the Radial Basis Function (TDRBF) network and evaluate its performance on recognising simple pointing and waving hand gestures in image sequences. Experimental results are presented that show that high levels of performance can be obtained for this type of gesture recognition using such techniques, both for particular individuals and across a set of individuals. Characteristic visual evidence can be automatically selected, depending on the task demands.

Keywords

Face Recognition IEEE Computer Society Radial Basis Function Neural Network Gesture Recognition Radial Basis Function Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Jonathan Howell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hilary Buxton
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Cognitive and Computing SciencesBrightonUK
  2. 2.University of SussexBrightonUK

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