Level Set Methods for Computation in Hybrid Systems

  • Ian Mitchell
  • Claire J. Tomlin
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1790)

Abstract

Reachability analysis is frequently used to study the safety of control systems. We present an implementation of an exact reachability operator for nonlinear hybrid systems. After a brief review of a previously presented algorithm for determining reachable sets and synthesizing control laws—upon whose theory the new implementation rests—an equivalent formulation is developed of the key equations governing the continuous state reachability. The new formulation is implemented using level set methods, and its effectiveness is shown by the numerical solution of three examples.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Mitchell
    • 1
  • Claire J. Tomlin
    • 2
  1. 1.Scientific Computing and Computational Mathematics Program, Gates 2BStanford UniversityStanford
  2. 2.Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 250 DurandStanford UniversityStanford

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