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Workshop on Graph Transformation and Visual Modeling Techniques

  • Paolo Bottoni
  • Mark Minas
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2505)

Abstract

Diagrammatic notations have accompanied the development of technical and scientific disciplines in fields as diverse as mechanical engineering, quantum physics, category theory, and software engineering. In general, diagrammatic notations allow the construction of images associated with an interpretation based on considering as significant some well-defined spatial relations among graphical tokens. These tokens either derive from conventional notations employed in a user community or are elements specially designed to convey some meaning. The notations serve the purpose of defining the (types of) entities one is interested in and the types of relations among these entities. Hence, types must be distinguishable from one another and no ambiguity may arise as to their interpretation. Moreover, the set of spatial relations to be considered must be clearly defined, and the holding of any relation among any set of elements must be decidable.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paolo Bottoni
    • 1
  • Mark Minas
    • 2
  1. 1.Università di Roma “La Sapienza”Italy
  2. 2.University of ErlangenGermany

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