Skills Management in Knowledge-Intensive Organizations

  • V. Richard Benjamins
  • José Manuel López Cobo
  • Jesús Contreras
  • Joaquín Casillas
  • Juan Blasco
  • Blanca de Otto
  • Juli García
  • Mercedes Blázquez
  • Juan Manuel Dodero
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2473)

Abstract

In order for organizations to survive on increasingly competitive and global markets, adequate management of intellectual capital is essential. Although increasingly more information is found in electronic formats, turning this information into valuable knowledge is still the responsibility of people by applying it in professional situations to generate value. In this paper, we describe an approach and software tool to accompany organizations in the Knowledge Economy, where intellectual capital is the principal asset for organizations. In our approach we view people as sellers of knowledge, while departments, projects, profiles, and organizations are viewed as knowledge buyers. Together they constitute a knowledge market where the goods to be traded are competencies. The identification of knowledge gaps forms an important event to undertake action to compensate for the lack of competencies (training, new hiring, promoting, etc.).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Richard Benjamins
    • 1
  • José Manuel López Cobo
    • 1
  • Jesús Contreras
    • 1
  • Joaquín Casillas
    • 1
  • Juan Blasco
    • 1
  • Blanca de Otto
    • 1
  • Juli García
    • 1
  • Mercedes Blázquez
    • 1
  • Juan Manuel Dodero
    • 1
  1. 1.Intelligent Software ComponentsS.A.Spain

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