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Measurement of the Tip and Friction Force Acting on a Needle during Penetration

  • Hiroyuki Kataoka
  • Toshikatsu Washio
  • Kiyoyuki Chinzei
  • Kazuyuki Mizuhara
  • Christina Simone
  • Allison M. Okamura
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2488)

Abstract

We present the tip and friction forces acting on a needle during penetration into a canine prostate, independently measured by a 7-axis load cell newly developed for this purpose. This experimental apparatus clarifies the mechanics of needle penetration, potentially improving the development of surgical simulations. The behavior of both tip and friction forces can be used to determine the mechanical characteristics of the prostate tissue upon penetration, and the detection of the surface puncture, which appears in the friction force, makes it possible to estimate the true insertion depth of the needle in the tissue. The friction model caused by the clamping force on the needle can also be determined from the measured friction forces.

Keywords

Friction Force Needle Path Needle Penetration Surface Puncture Canine Prostate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroyuki Kataoka
    • 1
  • Toshikatsu Washio
    • 1
  • Kiyoyuki Chinzei
    • 1
  • Kazuyuki Mizuhara
    • 2
  • Christina Simone
    • 3
  • Allison M. Okamura
    • 3
  1. 1.National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and TechnologyIbarakiJapan
  2. 2.Dept. of Mechanical EngineeringTokyo Denki UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Dept. of Mechanical EngineeringJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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