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A System for Music Information Retrieval

  • Orla Lahart
  • Colm O’Riordan
Conference paper
  • 401 Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2464)

Abstract

Information Retrieval, and in part Music Information Retrieval, has come to the fore in recent years as a research area. In this paper we outline the design of a system which allows for the retrieval of tunes from a music database. We describe algorithms and implementation of techniques to allow for the retrieval of tunes based on the occurrence of phrases or sub-phrases together with algorithms for the comparison of tunes via the vector space model.

Keywords

Information Retrieval Vector Space Model Test Collection Music Information Retrieval Information Retrieval Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Orla Lahart
    • 1
  • Colm O’Riordan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ITNUIGalway

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