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Word Alignment in Digital Talking Books Using WFSTs

  • António Serralheiro
  • Diamantino Caseiro
  • Hugo Meinedo
  • Isabel Trancoso
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2458)

Abstract

This paper describes the motivation and the method that we used for aligning digital spoken books, and the results obtained both at a word level and at a phone level. This alignment will allow specific access interfaces for persons with special needs, and also tools for easily detecting and indexing units (words, sentences, topics) in the spoken books. The tool was implemented in a Weighted Finite State Transducer framework, which provides an efficient way to combine different types of knowledge sources, such as alternative pronunciation rules. With this tool, a 2-hour long spoken book was aligned in a single step in much less than real time.

Keywords

Acoustic Model Word Level Word Error Rate Terminal Symbol Word Alignment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    ANSI/NISO Z39.86— 2002 Specifications for the Digital Talking Book, http://www.niso.org/standards/index.html
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • António Serralheiro
    • 1
  • Diamantino Caseiro
    • 1
  • Hugo Meinedo
    • 1
  • Isabel Trancoso
    • 1
  1. 1.L2F Spoken Language Systems Lab.INESC-ID/ISTLisbonPortugal

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