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Vampire 1.1

  • Alexandre Riazanov
  • Andrei Voronkov
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2083)

Abstract

In this abstract we describe version 1.1 of the theorem prover Vampire. We give a general description and comment on Vampire’s original features and differences with the previously described version 0.0.

From the very beginning, the main research principle of Vampire was efficiency. Vampire uses a large number of data structures for indexing terms and clauses. Efficiency is still the most distinctive feature of Vampire. Due to reimplementation of some algorithms and data structures, Vampire 1.1 is on the average considerably more efficient than Vampire 0.0.

However, the last year many efforts were invested in flexibility: several new inference and simplification rules were implemented, options for controlling the proof search process added, and new literal selection schemes designed.

For the remaining time before IJCAR 2001, we are going to concentrate on adding more flexibility to Vampire, both for experienced and inexperienced users.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandre Riazanov
    • 1
  • Andrei Voronkov
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentUniversity of ManchesterUK

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