Automatic Short Story Generator Based on Autonomous Agents

  • Yunju Shim
  • Minkoo Kim
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2413)

Abstract

The main purpose of this research is to generate consistent stories using autonomous characters. For this purpose, we develop a short story (called an episode) generator based on autonomous character agents. In order to generate consistent stories, the character agents have multi-level goals: viewer goals, plot goals, and character goals. The viewer goal represents emotional states that the author wants users to get. The plot goal represents a key scene, called a plot point, and characters play a role to achieve the plot point. The character goal is what it wants to achieve vocationally, physiologically, or mentally. In this paper, we propose a character agent system that can generate plot goals to achieve both viewer and character goals.

Keywords

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yunju Shim
    • 1
  • Minkoo Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information and Computer ScienceAjou UniversitySuwonKorea

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