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Regularities in the Formation and Evolution of Information Cities

  • Stelios Lelis
  • Petros Kavassalis
  • Jakka Sairamesh
  • Seif Haridi
  • Fredrik Holmgren
  • Mahmoud Rafea
  • Antonis Hatzistamatiou
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2362)

Abstract

In the real world, cities exist because of external economies associated with the geographic concentration of firms within a city. Of course, such a geographic proximity with input providers and consumers, would at first reduce transportation costs. But why cities, information cities, i.e. large agglomerations of people and economic activity emerge in the virtual world? In the Internet, transportation costs are zero. Web sites can easily be reached from anybody and everywhere with no particular cost. In these conditions of equal access distance, one would rather expect a smooth web geography with a relatively even distribution of visitors per site. However, the web economy illustrates strong agglomeration trends with a very small number of web sites capturing a large segment of the web population and the most of virtual economic activity. This paper attempts to provide a sound basis for the dynamics of population concentration in the web under increasing returns.

Keywords

Transportation Cost Virtual World Internet User Small World Empirical Regularity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stelios Lelis
    • 1
  • Petros Kavassalis
    • 2
  • Jakka Sairamesh
    • 3
  • Seif Haridi
    • 4
  • Fredrik Holmgren
    • 4
  • Mahmoud Rafea
    • 4
  • Antonis Hatzistamatiou
    • 1
  1. 1.ICS-FORTHInstitute for Computer Science, Foundation of Research and Technology - HellasHeraklion, CreteGreece
  2. 2.ICS-FORTHInstitute for Computer Science, Foundation of Research and Technology - HellasHeraklion, CreteGreece
  3. 3.IBM Thomas J. Watson Research CenterIBM Institute for Advanced CommerceYorktown Heights
  4. 4.SICSSwedish Institute of Computer ScienceKistaSweden

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