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A Workflow Change is a Workflow

  • Clarence A. Ellis
  • Karim Keddara
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1806)

Abstract

Organizations that are geared for success within today’s business environments must be capable of rapid and continuous change. This business reality is boosting the popularity of various types of workflow systems. However, current workflow systems are not yet capable of facing the ever-changing nature of their business environment. Part of the answer to the challenge, in our view, lies in change understanding, communication, implementation, and analysis. In this chapter, we present an overview of our work on modeling dynamic change within workflow systems. This work was recently completed by the introduction of \( \mathcal{M}\mathcal{L}--\mathcal{D}\mathcal{E}\mathcal{W}\mathcal{S} \), a Modeling Language to support Dynamic Evolution within workflow Systems. We firmly believe the thesis put forth in this chapter that a change is a process that can be modeled, enacted, analyzed, simulated and monitored as any process.

Keywords

Modeling Language Change Region Change Modality Migration Process Order Form 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clarence A. Ellis
    • 1
  • Karim Keddara
    • 1
  1. 1.Collaboration Technology Research Group Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA

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