Recommending Context-Sensitive and Process-Oriented Tourist Information to the Disabled The PALIO Case

  • Michael Pieper
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2398)

Abstract

Aim and ambition of the PALIO project is to provide new information services, directly available for tourists and citizen by developing and implementing complex data systems with user friendly and personalized interfaces. PALIO is sensitive to the tourist needs and makes the organization of touristic stays easier. The system offers services like information on how to move in a visited town, gives hints about available accommodation, parking lots, tourist guides, restaurants, museums, cultural events etc. A certain part of this information is especially related to disabled tourists, e.g. about places which have easy accessibility in terms of entrances, large doors, slides, lifts, toilets, etc.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Pieper
    • 1
  1. 1.Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology (FhG-FIT)Sankt Augustin

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