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Formalizing a Language for Institutions and Norms

  • Marc Esteva
  • Julian Padget
  • Carles Sierra
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2333)

Abstract

One source of trust for physical trading systems is their physical assets and simply their presence. A similar baseline does not exist for electronic trading systems, but one way in which it may be possible to create that initial trust is through the abstract notion of an institution, defined in terms of norms [19] and the scenes within which (software) agents may play roles in different trading activities, governed by those norms. We present here a case for institutions in electronic trading, a specification language for institutions (covering norms, performative structure, scenes, roles, etc.) and its semantics and how this may be mapped into formal languages such as process algebra and various forms of logic, so that there is a framework within which norms can be stated and proven.

Keywords

Mobile Agent External Agent Process Algebra Boolean Expression Auction House 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc Esteva
    • 1
  • Julian Padget
    • 2
  • Carles Sierra
    • 1
  1. 1.Artificial Intelligence Research Institute, IIIASpanish Council for Scientific Research, CSICBellaterra, BarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of BathBATHUK

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