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Root Growth Measurements in Object Coordinates

  • Norbert Kirchgeβner
  • Hagen Spies
  • Hanno Scharr
  • Uli Schurr
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2191)

Abstract

We show a framework for growth analysis of plant roots in object coordinates which is one requirement for the botanical evaluation of growth mechanisms in roots. The method presented here is appliable on long image sequences up to several days, it has no limit for the sequence length. First we estimate the displacement vector field with the structure tensor method. Thereafter we determine the physiological coordinates of the root by active contours. The contours are first fitted on the root boundary and yield the data for the calculation of the middle line as the object coordinate axis of the root. In the third step the displacement field is sampled at the position of the middle line and projected onto it. The result is an array of tangential displacement vectors along the root which is used to compute the spatially resolved expansion rate of the root in physiological coordinates. Finally, the potential of the presented framework is demonstrated on synthetic and real data.

Keywords

Displacement Vector Active Contour Middle Line Active Contour Model Tangential Displacement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norbert Kirchgeβner
    • 1
  • Hagen Spies
    • 1
  • Hanno Scharr
    • 1
  • Uli Schurr
    • 2
  1. 1.Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific ComputingUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Institute of BotanyUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany

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