WordNet++: A Lexicon Supporting the Color-X Method

  • Ans A.G. Steuten
  • Frank Dehne
  • Reind P. van de Riet
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1959)

Abstract

In this paper we discuss what kind of information can be obtained from WordNet and what kind of information should be added to WordNet in order to make it better suitable for the support of the Color-X method. We will present an extension of WordNet (called WordNet++) which contains a number of special types of relationships that are not available in WordNet. Additionally, WordNet++ is instantiated with knowledge about some particular domain.

Keywords

Linguistic relations Conceptual Modeling WordNet CASE tools Object Orientation Ontology Consistency Checking 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ans A.G. Steuten
    • 1
    • 2
  • Frank Dehne
    • 1
    • 2
  • Reind P. van de Riet
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Vrije UniversiteitAmsterdam
  2. 2.Faculty of SciencesDivision of Mathematics and Computer SciencesHV AmsterdamThe Netherlands

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