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Robust Software Tokens — Yet Another Method for Securing User’s Digital Identity

  • Taekyoung Kwon
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2727)

Abstract

This paper presents a robust software token that was developed to protect user’s digital identity by simple software-only techniques. This work is closely related to Hoover and Kausik’s software smart cards, and MacKenzie and Reiter’s networked cryptographic devices, in the fact that user’s private key is protected by postulating a remote server rather than tamper-resistance. The robust software token is aimed to be richer than the related schemes in terms of security, efficiency and flexibility. A two-party RSA scheme was carefully applied for the purpose, in a way of considering practical construction rather than theoretical framework.

Keywords

Blind Signature Dictionary Attack Blind Signature Scheme Robust Software Untrusted Server 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Taekyoung Kwon
    • 1
  1. 1.Sejong UniversitySeoulKorea

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