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Ramsete pp 121-154 | Cite as

Interaction Control

  • Fabrizio Caccavale
  • Ciro Natale
  • Bruno Siciliano
  • Luigi Villani
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Control and Information Sciences book series (LNCIS, volume 270)

Abstract

In the framework of interaction control of robotic systems, impedance control represents one of the most effective strategies when the model of the environment is not available. In this chapter, a new impedance control strategy is presented for six-degree-of freedom (six-DOF) tasks. The main features are geometric consistency and absence of singularities. The case of a single manipulator interacting with the environment is considered first. Then, the case of redundant manipulators is analysed, and an algorithm ensuring stabilisation of null-space velocities is presented. The redundant degrees of mobility are exploited to optimise an additional task function. Finally, the case of cooperative robots manipulating a common object is addressed: both the problems of loose and tight cooperation are considered. The theoretical findings are validated in experiments on a dual-robot industrial setup.

Keywords

Euler Angle Impedance Control Orientation Error Rotational Part Interaction Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fabrizio Caccavale
    • 1
  • Ciro Natale
    • 1
  • Bruno Siciliano
    • 1
  • Luigi Villani
    • 1
  1. 1.PRISMA Lab, Dipartimento di Informatica e SistemisticaUniversità degli Studi di Napoli Federico IINapoliItaly

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