Induction of Recursive Theories in the Normal ILP Setting: Issues and Solutions

  • Floriana Esposito
  • Donato Malerba
  • Francesca A. Lisi
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1866)

Abstract

Induction of recursive theories in the normal ILP setting is a complex task because of the non-monotonicity of the consistency property. In this paper we propose computational solutions to some relevant issues raised by the multiple predicate learning problem. A separate-and-parallel-conquer search strategy is adopted to interleave the learning of clauses supplying predicates with mutually recursive definitions. A novel generality order to be imposed to the search space of clauses is investigated in order to cope with recursion in a more suitable way. The consistency recovery is performed by reformulating the current theory and by applying a layering technique based on the collapsed dependency graph. The proposed approach has been implemented in the ILP system ATRE and tested in the specific context of the document understanding problem within the WISDOM project. Experimental results are discussed and future directions are drawn.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Floriana Esposito
    • 1
  • Donato Malerba
    • 1
  • Francesca A. Lisi
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di InformaticaUniversità degli Studi di BariBariItaly

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