Computational Modelling of Particle Degradation in Dilute Phase Pneumatic Conveyors

  • P. Chapelle
  • N. Christakis
  • H. Abou-Chakra
  • U. Tuzun
  • I. Bridle
  • M. S. A. Bradley
  • M. K. Patel
  • M. Cross
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2667)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to develop a mathematical model with the ability to predict particle degradation during dilute phase pneumatic conveying. A numerical procedure, based on a matrix representation of degradation processes, is presented to determine the particle impact degradation propensity from a small number of particle single impact tests carried out in a new designed laboratory scale degradation tester. A complete model of particle degradation during dilute phase pneumatic conveying is then described, where the calculation of degradation propensity is coupled with a flow model of the solids and gas phases in the pipeline. Numerical results are presented for degradation of granulated sugar in an industrial scale pneumatic conveyor.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Chapelle
    • 1
  • N. Christakis
    • 1
  • H. Abou-Chakra
    • 2
  • U. Tuzun
    • 2
  • I. Bridle
    • 3
  • M. S. A. Bradley
    • 3
  • M. K. Patel
    • 1
  • M. Cross
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Numerical Modelling and Process AnalysisUniversity of Greenwich, Old Royal Naval CollegeLondonUK
  2. 2.Chemical and Process Engineering, School of EngineeringUniversity of SurreyGuildford, SurreyUK
  3. 3.The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling TechnologyUniversity of GreenwichWoolwich, LondonUK

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