Sensing Actions, Time, and Concurrency in the Situation Calculus

  • Stephen Zimmerbaum
  • Richard Scherl
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1986)

Abstract

A formal framework for specifying and developing agents/robots must handle not only knowledge and sensing actions, but also time and concurrency. Researchers have extended the situation calculus to handle knowledge and sensing actions. Other researchers have addressed the issue of adding time and concurrent actions. We combine both of these features into a unified logical theory of knowledge, sensing, time, and concurrency. The result preserves the solution to the frame problem of previous work, maintains the distinction between indexical and objective knowledge of time, and is capable of representing the various ways in which concurrency interacts with time and knowledge.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Zimmerbaum
    • 1
  • Richard Scherl
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer and Information ScienceNew Jersey Institute of TechnologyUniversity HeightsNewarkNew Jersey

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