Analysing Web Search Logs to Determine Session Boundaries for User-Oriented Learning

  • Ayse Göker
  • Daqing He
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1892)

Abstract

Incremental learning approaches based on user search activities provide a means of building adaptive information retrieval systems. To develop more effective user-oriented learning techniques for the Web, we need to be able to identify a meaningful session unit from which we can learn. Without this, we run a high risk of grouping together activities that are unrelated or perhaps not from the same user. We are interested in detecting boundaries of sequences between related activities (sessions) that would group the activities for a learning purpose. Session boundaries, in Reuters transaction logs, were detected automatically. The generated boundaries were compared with human judgements. The comparison confirmed that a meaningful session threshold for establishing these session boundaries was confined to a 11-15 minute range.

Keywords

Human Judgement User Search Learning Purpose Minute Range Session Interval 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Balabanovic M., Shoham Y., and Yun Y.: An Adaptive Agent for Automated Web Browsing. Tech. Rep. CS-TN-97-52, Dept. of Comp. Sci., Stanford University (1997)Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Catledge L. and Pitkow J.: Characterizing Browsing Strategies in the World-Wide Web. In 3rd International World-Wide Web Conference (1995) http://www.igd.fhg.de/archive/1995www95/papers/
  3. [3]
    He D. and Goker A.: Detecting session boundaries from Web user logs. In 22nd Annual Colloquium on IR Research IRSG 2000, Cambridge, UK (2000) 57–66Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Jansen J., Spink A., Bateman J., and Saracevic T.: Real Life Information Retrieval: A Study of User Queries on the Web. SIGIR Forum, 32(1)(1998) 5–17CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Joachims T., Freitag D., and Mitchell T.: WebWatcher: A Tour Guide for the World Wide Web. In Proceedings of IJCAI97 (1997) 770–775Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ayse Göker
    • 1
  • Daqing He
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer and Mathematical SciencesThe Robert Gordon UniversityScotland

Personalised recommendations