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Strategies for Hotlink Assignments

  • Prosenjit Bose
  • Jurek Czyzowicz
  • Leszek Gąsieniec
  • Evangelos Kranakis
  • Danny Krizanc
  • Andrzej Pelc
  • Miguel Vargas Martin
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1969)

Abstract

Consider a DAG (directed acyclic graph) G = (V,E) representing a collection V of web pages connected via links E. All web pages can be reached from a designated source page, represented by a source node s of G. Each web page carries a weight representative of the frequency with which it is visited. By adding hotlinks, at most one per page, we are interested in minimizing the expected number of steps needed to visit a selected set of web pages from the source page. For arbitrary DAGs we show that the problem is NP-complete.

We also give algorithms for assigning hotlinks, as well as upper and lower bounds on the expected number of steps to reach the leaves from the source page s located at the root of a complete binary tree. Depending on the probability distribution (arbitrary, uniform, Zipf) the expected number of steps is at most c . n, where c is a constant less than 1. For the geometric distribution we show how to obtain a constant average number of steps.

Keywords

Source Node Binary Tree Directed Edge Geometric Distribution Zipf Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Prosenjit Bose
    • 1
  • Jurek Czyzowicz
    • 2
  • Leszek Gąsieniec
    • 3
  • Evangelos Kranakis
    • 1
  • Danny Krizanc
    • 1
  • Andrzej Pelc
    • 2
  • Miguel Vargas Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer ScienceCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada
  2. 2.Dept. InformatiqueUniv. du Québec à HullHullCanada
  3. 3.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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