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EasyLiving: Technologies for Intelligent Environments

  • Barry Brumitt
  • Brian Meyers
  • John Krumm
  • Amanda Kern
  • Steven Shafer
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1927)

Abstract

The EasyLiving project is concerned with development of an architecture and technologies for intelligent environments which allow the dy- namic aggregation of diverse I/O devices into a single coherent user experi- ence. Components of such a system include middleware (to facilitate distrib- uted computing), world modelling (to provide location-based context), perception (to collect information about world state), and service description (to support decomposition of device control, internal logic, and user interface). This paper describes the current research in each of these areas, highlighting some common requirements for any intelligent environment.

Keywords

Service Description Intelligent Environment Lookup Service Person Tracker AAAI Spring Symposium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry Brumitt
    • 1
  • Brian Meyers
    • 1
  • John Krumm
    • 1
  • Amanda Kern
    • 1
  • Steven Shafer
    • 1
  1. 1.Microsoft ResearchRedmondUSA

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