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Convertible Undeniable Signatures

  • Joan Boyar
  • David Chaum
  • Ivan Damgård
  • Torben Pedersen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 537)

Abstract

We introduce a new concept called convertible undeniable signature schemes. In these schemes, release of a single bit string by the signer turns all of his signatures, which were originally undeniable signatures, into ordinary digital signatures. We prove that the existence of such schemes is implied by the existence of digital signature schemes. Then, looking at the problem more practically, we present a very efficient convertible undeniable signature scheme. This scheme has the added benefit that signatures can also be selectively converted.

Keywords

Signature Scheme Discrete Logarithm Commitment Scheme Valid Signature Pseudorandom Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joan Boyar
    • 1
  • David Chaum
    • 2
  • Ivan Damgård
    • 1
  • Torben Pedersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Aarhus UniversityAarhusDenmark
  2. 2.CWIDenmark

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