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PISA — A Platform and Programming Language Independent Interface for Search Algorithms

  • Stefan Bleuler
  • Marco Laumanns
  • Lothar Thiele
  • Eckart Zitzler
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2632)

Abstract

This paper introduces an interface specification (PISA) that allows to separate the problem-specific part of an optimizer from the problem-independent part. We propose a view of the general optimization scenario, where the problem representation together with the variation operators is seen as an integral part of the optimization problem and can hence be easily separated from the selection operators. Both parts are implemented as independent programs, that can be provided as ready-to-use packages and arbitrarily combined. This makes it possible to specify and implement representation-independent selection modules, which form the essence of modern multiobjective optimization algorithms. The variation operators, on the other hand, have to be defined in one module together with the optimization problem, facilitating a customized problem description. Besides the specification, the paper contains a correctness proof for the protocol and measured efficiency results.

Keywords

Data Exchange Variation Operator Multiobjective Optimization Parent Individual Common Parameter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Bleuler
    • 1
  • Marco Laumanns
    • 1
  • Lothar Thiele
    • 1
  • Eckart Zitzler
    • 1
  1. 1.ETH Zürich, Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory (TIK)ZürichSwitzerland

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