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Natix: A Technology Overview

  • Thorsten Fiebig
  • Sven Helmer
  • Carl-Christian Kanne
  • Guido Moerkotte
  • Julia Neumann
  • Robert Schiele
  • Till Westmann
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2593)

Abstract

Several alternatives to manage large XML document collections exist, ranging from file systems over relational or other database systems to specifically tailored XML base management systems. In this paper we review Natix, a database management system designed from scratch for storing and processing XML data. Contrary to the common belief that management of XML data is just another application for traditional databases like relational systems, we indicate how almost every component in a database system is affected in terms of adequacy and performance. We show what kind of problems have to be tackled when designing and optimizing areas such as storage, transaction management comprising recovery and multi-user synchronization as well as query processing for XML.

Keywords

Secondary Memory XPath Expression Split Matrix Document Object Model Proxy Node 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thorsten Fiebig
    • 1
  • Sven Helmer
    • 2
  • Carl-Christian Kanne
    • 3
  • Guido Moerkotte
    • 2
  • Julia Neumann
    • 2
  • Robert Schiele
    • 2
  • Till Westmann
    • 3
  1. 1.Software AG ThorstenGermany
  2. 2.Universität MannheimMannheim
  3. 3.data ex machina GmbHGermany

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