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Access to Multimedia Information through Multisource and Multilanguage Information Extraction

  • Horacio Saggion
  • Hamish Cunningham
  • Kalina Bontcheva
  • Diana Maynard
  • Cris Ursu
  • Oana Hamza
  • Yorick Wilks
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2553)

Abstract

We describe our work on information extraction from multiple sources for the Multimedia Indexing and Searching Environment, a project aiming at developing technology to produce formal annotations about essential events in multimedia programme material. The creation of a composite index from multiple and multi-lingual sources is a unique aspect of this project. The domain chosen for tuning the software components and testing is football. Our information extraction system is based on the use of finite state machinery pipelined with full semantic analysis and discourse interpretation.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Horacio Saggion
    • 1
  • Hamish Cunningham
    • 1
  • Kalina Bontcheva
    • 1
  • Diana Maynard
    • 1
  • Cris Ursu
    • 1
  • Oana Hamza
    • 1
  • Yorick Wilks
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldEngland, UK

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