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Economic Scheduling in Grid Computing

  • Carsten Ernemann
  • Volker Hamscher
  • Ramin Yahyapour
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2537)

Abstract

Grid computing is a promising technology for future computing platforms. Here, the task of scheduling computing resources proves difficult as resources are geographically distributed and owned by individuals with different access and cost policies. This paper addresses the idea of applying economic models to the scheduling task. To this end a scheduling infrastructure and a market-economic method is presented. The efficiency of this approach in terms of response- and waittime minimization as well as utilization is evaluated by simulations with real workload traces. The evaluations show that the presented economic scheduling algorithm provides similar or even better average weighted response-times as common algorithms like backfilling. This is especially promising as the presented economic models have additional advantages as e.g. support for different price models, optimization objectives, access policies or quality of service demands.

Keywords

Utility Function Grid Computing Grid Environment Utility Function Machine Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carsten Ernemann
    • 1
  • Volker Hamscher
    • 1
  • Ramin Yahyapour
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Engineering InstituteUniversity of DortmundDortmundGermany

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