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Coaching a Soccer Simulation Team in RoboCup Environment

  • J. Habibi
  • E. Chiniforooshan
  • A. HeydarNoori
  • M. Mirzazadeh
  • M. A. Safari
  • H. R. Younesy
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2510)

Abstract

Constructing soccer robots is an attempt in development of AI researches, done by defining a standard problem and solving it by many researchers all over the world. In this field, every year a formal federation holds international competitions, called RoboCup [1]. The Simulation League is one of the branches of the RoboCup.

We have designed and implemented an online coach for a soccer simulation team, which is able to analyze the simulated match similar to a coach in a real football match, and sends commands to the players to improve their behaviors and get a better result from the match process. This coach is able to exchange the roles between players during the match. Also, it has the capability of recognizing the opponent formation and improving the playing style of the team. This coach got the 1st place of Seattle’2001 RoboCup world championship in the field of online coaches.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Habibi
  • E. Chiniforooshan
  • A. HeydarNoori
  • M. Mirzazadeh
  • M. A. Safari
  • H. R. Younesy

There are no affiliations available

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