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Problem-Based Learning as an Example of Active Learning and Student Engagement

Invited Talk
  • Scott Grabinger
  • Joanna C. Dunlap
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2457)

Abstract

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional strategy that focuses on critical reasoning to achieve a high degree of student engagement. PBL is an example of rich environments for active learning (REAL). REALs are comprehensive instructional systems that promote study and investigation within authentic contexts; encourage the growth of student engagement and responsibility, decision making, and intentional learning; cultivate collaboration among students and teachers; utilize dynamic, interdisciplinary, generative learning activities that promote higher-order thinking processes to help students develop rich and complex knowledge structures; and, assess student progress in content and learning-to-learn within authentic contexts using realistic tasks and performances. In this chapter, we compare existing assumptions underlying education with new assumptions that promote problem solving and higher-level thinking.

Keywords

Student Engagement Cooperative Learning Metacognitive Skill Educational Technology Research Authentic Context 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott Grabinger
    • 1
  • Joanna C. Dunlap
    • 1
  1. 1.Information and Learning TechnologiesUniversity of Colorado at DenverDenverUSA

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