Getting closer: How Simulation and Humanoid League can benefit from each other

  • Joschka Boedecker
  • Norbert Michael Mayer
  • Masaki Ogino
  • Rodrigo da Silva Guerra
  • Masaaki Kikuchi
  • Minoru Asada

Summary

This paper presents the current efforts and ideas of members in the RoboCup Simulation and the Humanoid Leagues to take successful concepts from both environments and extend them in ways so that each league can profit from the results. We describe the ongoing development of the 3D simulator which is being extended to simulate a real humanoid robot. At the same time, we give an insight into the current behavior development framework of the Humanoid League team Senchans which makes heavy use of techniques which have been successfully used in the Simulation League before. Furthermore, we give some suggestions for a collaboration between the different leagues in the RoboCup from which all the participants could benefit.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joschka Boedecker
    • 1
  • Norbert Michael Mayer
    • 2
    • 3
  • Masaki Ogino
    • 2
  • Rodrigo da Silva Guerra
    • 2
  • Masaaki Kikuchi
    • 2
  • Minoru Asada
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.AI Research GroupUniversität Koblenz-LandauKoblenzGermany
  2. 2.Dept. of Adaptive Machine SystemsOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan
  3. 3.HANDAI Frontier Research Center, Graduate School of EngineeringOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan

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