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Global and Neotropical Distribution and Diversity of Oak (genus Quercus) and Oak Forests

  • K. C. Nixon
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 185)

1.5 Conclusions

The Neotropics, particularly southern Mexico, harbors the greatest diversity of oak species in the New World. These oaks are often among the tallest trees in the forest areas in which they occur, ranging from low-elevation to high montane forests. The clearest relationships of Central American oaks are with lower-elevation Mexican oaks. Several species are widespread from Mexico to Costa Rica and Panama. In addition, at least one distinctive clade of red oaks with annual maturation is common in Central America and Colombia, and includes members of the Q. seemannii complex (including Q. rapurahuensis and Q. gulielmi-treleasei), Q. costaricensis and Q. eugeniifolia, and, in Colombia, Q. humboldtii.

Keywords

Montane Forest Temperate Deciduous Forest Pacific Slope Lower Montane Forest Atlantic Slope 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. C. Nixon
    • 1
  1. 1.L.H. Bailey Hortorium, Department of Plant BiologyCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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