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Supercomputing about physical objects

  • John R. Rice
Session 5: Parallel Processing II
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 297)

Abstract

Scientific and technological advances in the next 5 to 10 years will make it feasible to create an integrated, interactive system for the design, manipulation and analysis of collections of physical objects. These advances will come in computing power through the mechanism of parallel computation, in algorithms for geometry, in problem solving systems to provide very high level user interfaces and in graphics to allow direct visualization of the behavior of the physical objects. In this paper we describe the project Computing about Physical Objects which is to explore the associated technical problems and to build prototypes of such systems. The focus here is upon the role of supercomputers in this area and, especially, their application to solving the partial differential equations that model many physical phenomena.

Keywords

Physical Object Algebraic Curf Elliptic Partial Differential Equation Library Module Machine Selection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Rice
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteU.S.A.

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