Advertisement

Garbage collection in a distributed environment

  • Lex Augusteijn
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 259)

Abstract

A garbage collector for a distributed system is described. This collector is of the mark and sweep type, each processor having its own garbage collector process, with access to local data only. In order to limit idle time for the processors in this system, the garbage collectors run on-the-fly, that is, concurrently with the user program. The requirements put on the user program to achieve this are described. A new termination detection algorithm is imposed on the garbage collector, in order to detect a global state.

Keywords

Garbage Collection Garbage Collector Black Object White Object Philips Research Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [TA415]
    Parallel Architectures and Languages for A.I.P., a VLSI-directed Approach, A Technical Annex for project 415, Oct. 1984. Philips Research Laboratories, EindHoven, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
  2. [D0053]
    P. America, Rationale for the design of POOL. Doc.nr. 0053. Esprit project 415, subproject A. Philips Research Laboratories, EindHoven, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
  3. [D0091]
    P.America, Definition of the programming language POOL-T. Doc.nr. 0091. Esprit project 415, subproject A. Philips Research Laboratories, EindHoven, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
  4. [D0104]
    A. Augusteijn, POOL-T User Manual. Doc.nr. 0104. Esprit project 415, subproject A. Philips Research Laboratories, EindHoven, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
  5. [D0183]
    Augusteijn, A. Establishing global assertions in a distributed environment. Doc. nr. 0183. Esprit project 415, subproject A Philips Research Laboratories, EindHoven, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
  6. [D0204]
    Bronnenberg, W.J.H.J., Janssens, M.D., Odijk, E.A.M., van Twist, R.A.H. The architecture of DOOM. Presentation at the Esprit-415 summerschool 1986. Doc. nr. 0204. Esprit project 415, subproject A. Philips Research Laboratories, EindHoven, The Netherlands. To appear in Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  7. [Chan 85]
    Chandy, K.M. and Lamport, L. Distributed snapshots: Determining global states of distributed systems. ACM Transactions on Computer Systems 3, 1 (February 1985), 63–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [Chan 86]
    Chandy, K.M. and Misra, J. An Example of Stepwise Refinement of Distributed Programs: Quiescence Detection. ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems 8, 3 (July 1986), 326–343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. [Dijk 78]
    Dijkstra, E.W., Lamport, L., Martin, A.J. and Steffens, E.F.M. On-the-Fly Garbage Collection: An Exercise in Cooperation. Comm ACM 21, 11 (Nov. 1978), 966–975.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. [Odijk 87]
    Odijk, E.A.M. Presentation on Esprit project 415, subproject A (Philips Research). These proceedings.Google Scholar
  11. [Tel 86]
    Tel, G., Tan, R.B. and van Leeuwen, J. The Derivation of Graph Marking Algorithms from Distributed Termination Detection Protocols. Techn. Rep. RUU-CS-86-11, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 1986.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lex Augusteijn
    • 1
  1. 1.Philips Research Laboratories EindhovenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations