A prolog technology theorem prover: Implementation by an extended prolog compiler

  • Mark E. Stickel
Logic Programming Oriented Deduction Systems
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 230)

Abstract

A Prolog technology theorem prover (PTTP) is an extension of Prolog that is complete for the full first-order predicate calculus. It differs from Prolog in its use of unification with the occurs check for soundness, the model-elimination reduction rule that is added to Prolog inferences to make the inference system complete, and consecutively bounded depth-first search instead of unbounded depth-first search to make the search strategy complete. A Prolog technology theorem prover has been implemented by an extended Prolog-to-Lisp compiler that supports these additional features. It is capable of proving theorems in the full first-order predicate calculus at a rate of thousands of inferences per second.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark E. Stickel
    • 1
  1. 1.Artificial Intelligence Center SRI InternationalMenlo Park

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