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Rational Secret Sharing, Revisited

  • S. Dov Gordon
  • Jonathan Katz
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4116)

Abstract

We consider the problem of secret sharing among n rational players. This problem was introduced by Halpern and Teague (STOC 2004), who claim that a solution is impossible for n=2 but show a solution for the case n≥3. Contrary to their claim, we show a protocol for rational secret sharing among n=2 players; our protocol extends to the case n≥3, where it is simpler than the Halpern-Teague solution and also offers a number of other advantages. We also show how to avoid the continual involvement of the dealer, in either our own protocol or that of Halpern and Teague.

Our techniques extend to the case of rational players trying to securely compute an arbitrary function, under certain assumptions on the utilities of the players.

Keywords

Nash Equilibrium Secret Sharing Cheap Talk Rational Player Adversarial Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Dov Gordon
    • 1
  • Jonathan Katz
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Computer ScienceUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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