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Implementing a Rule-Based Speech Synthesizer on a Mobile Platform

  • Tuomo Saarni
  • Jyri Paakkulainen
  • Tuomas Mäkilä
  • Jussi Hakokari
  • Olli Aaltonen
  • Jouni Isoaho
  • Tapio Salakoski
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4139)

Abstract

This paper describes the structure of a Finnish speech synthesis system developed at the University of Turku and evaluates the preliminary results of its implementation and performance on a platform with limited computing power. A rule-based approach was selected due to its high adaptability, low memory and computational capacity requirements. The speech synthesis system is written in JavaTM MIDP 2.0 and CLDC 1.1. The synthesis is implemented on Nokia 6680 mobile device as a 65 kilobyte MIDlet. The system produces artificial speech at the sampling rate of 16 kHz. The results show that for a second of synthesized speech it takes 2.66 seconds for the system to produce it. Although the implementation was successful, improvements are needed to achieve a more acceptable level of time consumption.

Keywords

Mobile Device Speech Signal Time Consumption Speech Sound Mobile Platform 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tuomo Saarni
    • 1
  • Jyri Paakkulainen
    • 2
  • Tuomas Mäkilä
    • 2
  • Jussi Hakokari
    • 3
  • Olli Aaltonen
    • 3
  • Jouni Isoaho
    • 1
  • Tapio Salakoski
    • 1
  1. 1.Turku Centre for Computer ScienceFinland
  2. 2.Department of Information TechnologyUniversity of TurkuFinland
  3. 3.Phonetics LaboratoryUniversity of TurkuFinland

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