Healthcare Service with Ubiquitous Sensor Networks for the Disabled and Elderly People

  • Yung Bok Kim
  • Daeyoung Kim
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4061)

Abstract

An e-healthcare service with ubiquitous sensor network (USN) for the disabled and elderly people was studied, considering the current technology as well as forthcoming technology and service in the ubiquitous computing and networking environment. We introduce the USN for e-healthcare service for the disabled and elderly in smart environments. Beyond e-healthcare service, as a primitive application for ubiquitous healthcare service using mobile Internet, we studied the real-time health-monitoring service for the disabled and elderly people with an inexpensive and effective Web server. We considered the health-monitoring sensors in the wrist phone, as a future product for ubiquitous healthcare service. For quality of service (QoS), we studied an evaluation scheme for U-healthcare service for the disabled in smart environments, considering diversity of technologies and services.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yung Bok Kim
    • 1
  • Daeyoung Kim
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer EngineeringSejong UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Information and Communications University (ICU)DaejonKorea

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