Persuasiveness of a Mobile Lifestyle Coaching Application Using Social Facilitation

  • Roland Gasser
  • Dominique Brodbeck
  • Markus Degen
  • Jürg Luthiger
  • Remo Wyss
  • Serge Reichlin
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3962)

Abstract

In a field study we compared usage and acceptance of a mobile lifestyle coaching application with a traditional web application. The participants (N=40) documented health behaviour (activity and healthy nutrition) daily, trying to reach a defined goal. In addition, health questionnaires and social facilitation features were provided to enhance motivation. Acceptance of the system was high in both groups. The mobile application was perceived as being more attractive and fun to use. Analysis of the usage patterns showed significant differences between the mobile and the web-based application. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of task compliance and health behaviour. The effectiveness of mobility and social facilitation was confounded by other variables, e.g. gender and age. Initial motivation for lifestyle change was related to the overall compliance and goal achievement of the participant. Implications show ways to strengthen the persuasiveness of health applications on mobile devices.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roland Gasser
    • 1
  • Dominique Brodbeck
    • 2
  • Markus Degen
    • 2
  • Jürg Luthiger
    • 2
  • Remo Wyss
    • 2
  • Serge Reichlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Medgate AGBaselSwitzerland
  2. 2.University of Applied Sciences Northwestern SwitzerlandOltenSwitzerland

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