Games and the Impossibility of Realizable Ideal Functionality

  • Anupam Datta
  • Ante Derek
  • John C. Mitchell
  • Ajith Ramanathan
  • Andre Scedrov
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/11681878_19

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3876)
Cite this paper as:
Datta A., Derek A., Mitchell J.C., Ramanathan A., Scedrov A. (2006) Games and the Impossibility of Realizable Ideal Functionality. In: Halevi S., Rabin T. (eds) Theory of Cryptography. TCC 2006. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 3876. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

A cryptographic primitive or a security mechanism can be specified in a variety of ways, such as a condition involving a game against an attacker, construction of an ideal functionality, or a list of properties that must hold in the face of attack. While game conditions are widely used, an ideal functionality is appealing because a mechanism that is indistinguishable from an ideal functionality is therefore guaranteed secure in any larger system that uses it. We relate ideal functionalities to games by defining the set of ideal functionalities associated with a game condition and show that under this definition, which reflects accepted use and known examples, bit commitment, a form of group signatures, and some other cryptographic concepts do not have any realizable ideal functionality.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anupam Datta
    • 1
  • Ante Derek
    • 1
  • John C. Mitchell
    • 1
  • Ajith Ramanathan
    • 1
  • Andre Scedrov
    • 2
  1. 1.Stanford University 
  2. 2.University of Pennsylvania 

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