Multi-view Object Tracking Using Sequential Belief Propagation

  • Wei Du
  • Justus Piater
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3851)

Abstract

Multiple cameras and collaboration between them make possible the integration of information available from multiple views and reduce the uncertainty due to occlusions. This paper presents a novel method for integrating and tracking multi-view observations using bidirectional belief propagation. The method is based on a fully connected graphical model where target states at different views are represented as different but correlated random variables, and image observations at a given view are only associated with the target states at the same view. The tracking processes at different views collaborate with each other by exchanging information using a message passing scheme, which largely avoids propagating wrong information. An efficient sequential belief propagation algorithm is adopted to perform the collaboration and to infer the multi-view target states. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on video-surveillance sequences.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Du
    • 1
  • Justus Piater
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Institut MontefioreUniversity of LiegeLiegeBelgium

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