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The Reliability and Validity of the Chinese Version of Abbreviated PAD Emotion Scales

  • Xiaoming Li
  • Haotian Zhou
  • Shengzun Song
  • Tian Ran
  • Xiaolan Fu
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3784)

Abstract

The study aimed at testing the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of Abbreviated PAD Emotion Scales using a Chinese sample. 297 Chinese undergraduate students were tested with the Chinese version of Abbreviated PAD Emotion Scales; 98 of them were retested with the same scales after seven days in order to assess the test-retest reliability; and 102 of them were tested with SCL-90 at the same time which was intended as criteria for validity to assess the criterion validity. The results showed that the Chinese version of Abbreviated PAD Emotion Scales displayed satisfying reliability and validity on P (pleasure-displeasure), only moderate reliability and validity on D (dominance-submissiveness), but quite low reliability and validity on A (arousal-nonarousal).

Keywords

Chinese Version Affective Computing Moderate Reliability AAAI Spring Symposium Alpha Internal Consistency Coefficient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoming Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Haotian Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shengzun Song
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tian Ran
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaolan Fu
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of PsychologyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Graduate SchoolChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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