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From Medical Geography to Computational Epidemiology – Dynamics of Tuberculosis Transmission in Enclosed Spaces

  • Joseph R. Oppong
  • Armin R. Mikler
  • Patrick Moonan
  • Stephen Weis
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3473)

Abstract

Medical geographers study the geographic distribution of health and health-related phenomena such as diseases, and health care facilities. Seeking to understand who is getting what diseases or health services where and why, they examine spatial disparities in access to health care services, and the geographic distribution of health risks. Medical geographers apply tools of geographic enquiry such as disease mapping and geographical correlation studies to health-related issues (Elliot et al., 2000; Pickle, 2002). Some have called this research endeavor spatial epidemiology (Cromley, 2003; Rushton, 2003a).

Keywords

Geographic Information System West Nile Virus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome High Performance Computing Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph R. Oppong
  • Armin R. Mikler
  • Patrick Moonan
  • Stephen Weis

There are no affiliations available

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