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Speech Based User Interface for Users with Special Needs

  • Pavel Slavík
  • Vladislav Němec
  • Adam J. Sporka
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3658)

Abstract

The number of people using computers is permanently increasing in last years. Not all potential users have all capabilities that allow them to use computers without obstacles. This is especially true for handicapped and elderly users. For this class of users a special approach for design and implementation of user interfaces is needed. The missing capabilities of these users must be substituted by capabilities that these users have. In most of cases the use of sounds and speech offers a natural solution to this problem. In the paper the outline of problems related to special user interfaces will be discussed. In further the examples of application of user interfaces using special forms of speech and related acoustic communication will be given.

Keywords

Virtual Environment Speech Recognition Assistive Technology Speech Synthesis Base User Interface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pavel Slavík
    • 1
  • Vladislav Němec
    • 1
  • Adam J. Sporka
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Department of Computer Science and EngineeringCzech Technical University in PraguePraha 2Czech Republic

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