A Strategy to Implement and Validate Industrial Applications of Holonic Systems

  • Francisco P. Maturana
  • Raymond J. Staron
  • Pavel Tichý
  • Petr Šlechta
  • Pavel Vrba
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3593)

Abstract

Classical control systems are based on feedback techniques and models that generally cannot manage computational complexity, nonlinearity and uncertainty. Moreover, classical control cannot adapt well to the variability of the processes under control in a dynamic fashion. However, agent-based control eases combinatorial complexity by enabling a robust partitioning of knowledge and behaviors. It is a difficult challenge to create the infrastructure, development system and validation tools for agent systems. In this paper we discuss fundamental steps to achieve the foundation infrastructure for creating agents but also we address several guidelines to create the agents and the requirements to present this to non-agent specialists.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francisco P. Maturana
    • 1
  • Raymond J. Staron
    • 1
  • Pavel Tichý
    • 2
  • Petr Šlechta
    • 2
  • Pavel Vrba
    • 2
  1. 1.Rockwell AutomationMayfield Hts.USA
  2. 2.Rockwell Automation s.r.o.Prague 5Czech Republic

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