Understanding the Requirements on Modelling Techniques

  • S. J. B. A. Hoppenbrouwers
  • H. A. Proper
  • Th. P. van der Weide
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3520)

Abstract

The focus of this paper is not on the requirements of an information system to be developed, but rather on the requirements that apply to the modelling techniques used during information system development. We claim that in past and present, many information systems modelling techniques have been developed without a proper understanding of the requirements that follow from the development processes in which these techniques are to be used. This paper provides a progress report on our research e.orts to obtain a fundamental understanding of the requirements mentioned. We discuss the underlying research issues, the research approach we use, the way of thinking (weltanschauung) that will be employed in finding the answers, and some first results.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bubenko, J.: Information System Methodologies - A Research View. In: Olle, T., Sol, H., Verrijn-Stuart, A. (eds.) Information Systems Design Methodologies: Improving the Practice, pp. 289–318. North-Holland/IFIP WG8.1, Amsterdam (1986)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Avison, D., Wood-Harper, A.: Information Systems Development Research: An Exploration of Ideas in Practice. The Computer Journal 34, 98–112 (1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Avison, D.: Information Systems Development: Methodologies, Techniques and Tools. 2nd edn. McGraw-Hill, New York (1995) ISBN 0077092333Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bernus, P., Mertins, K., Schmidt, G. (eds.): Handbook on Architectures of Information Systems. International Handbooks on Information Systems. Springer, Berlin (1998) ISBN 3-540-64453-9 Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Olle, T., Hagelstein, J., Macdonald, I., Rolland, C., Sol, H., Assche, F.v., Verrijn-Stuart, A.: Information Systems Methodologies: A Framework for Understanding. Addison-Wesley, Reading (1988) ISBN 0-201-54443-1Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bommel, P.v., Hofstede, A.t., Weide, T.v.d.: Semantics and verification of object-role models. Information Systems 16, 471–495 (1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hofstede, A.t., Weide, T.v.d.: Expressiveness in conceptual data modelling. Data & Knowledge Engineering 10, 65–100 (1993)MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bronts, G., Brouwer, S., Martens, C., Proper, H.: A Unifying Object Role Modelling Approach. Information Systems 20, 213–235 (1995)MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Creasy, P., Proper, H.: A Generic Model for 3-Dimensional Conceptual Modelling. Data & Knowledge Engineering 20, 119–162 (1996)MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Campbell, L., Halpin, T., Proper, H.: Conceptual Schemas with Abstractions – Making flat conceptual schemas more comprehensible. Data & Knowledge Engineering 20, 39–85 (1996)MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hoppenbrouwers, J., Vos, B.v.d., Hoppenbrouwers, S.: Nl structures and conceptual modelling: Grammalizing for KISS. Data & Knowledge Engineering 23, 79–92 (1997)MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Booch, G., Rumbaugh, J., Jacobson, I.: The Unified Modelling Language User Guide. Addison-Wesley, Reading (1999) ISBN 0-201-57168-4 Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Brooks, R.: Studying programming behavior experimentally: The problems of proper methodology. Communications of the ACM 23, 207–213 (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Avison, D., Lau, F., Meyers, M., Nielsen, P.: Action research. Communications of the ACM 42, 94–97 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Baskerville, R.: Investigating Information Systems with Action Research. Communications of the Association for Information Systems 2 (1999)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Blum, F.: Action research – a scientific approach? Philosophy of Science 22, 1–7 (1955)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Derksen, C., Frederiks, P., Weide, T.v.d.: Paraphrasing as a Technique to Support Object-Oriented Analysis. In: Riet, R.v.d., Burg, J., Vos, A.v.d. (eds.) Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Applications of Natural Language to Databases (NLDB 1996), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp. 28–39 (1996)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Frederiks, P., Weide, T.v.d.: Information modeling: the process and the required competencies of its participants. In: Meziane, F., Métais, E. (eds.) NLDB 2004. LNCS, vol. 3136, pp. 123–134. Springer, Heidelberg (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Bleeker, A., Proper, H., Hoppenbrouwers, S.: The role of concept management in system development – a practical and a theoretical perspective. In: Grabis, J., Persson, A., Stirna, J. (eds.) Forum proceedings of the 16th Conference on Advanced Information Systems 2004 (CAiSE 2004), Riga, Latvia, EU, Faculty of Computer Science and Information Technology, Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia, EU, pp. 73–82 (2004) ISBN 9984-9767-0-XGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Proper, H., Hoppenbrouwers, S.: Concept evolution in information system evolution. In: Gravis, J., Persson, A., Stirna, J. (eds.) Forum proceedings of the 16th Conference on Advanced Information Systems 2004 (CAiSE 2004), Riga, Latvia, EU, Faculty of Computer Science and Information Technology, Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia, EU, pp. 63–72 (2004)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Veldhuijzen van Zanten, G., Hoppenbrouwers, S., Proper, H.: System Development as a Rational Communicative Process. Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics 2 (2004), http://www.iiisci.org/Journal/sci/pdfs/P492036.pdf
  22. 22.
    Embley, D., Kurtz, B., Woodfield, S.: Object-Oriented Systems Analysis – A model-driven approach. Yourdon Press, Englewood Cliffs (1992) ASIN 0136299733Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Halpin, T.: Information Modeling and Relational Databases, From Conceptual Analysis to Logical Design. Morgan Kaufman, San Mateo (2001) ISBN 1-55860-672-6 Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Cruse, A.: Meaning in Language, an Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics. Oxford University Press, Oxford (2000) ISBN 0-198-70010-5 Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    The Architecture Working Group of the Software Engineering Committee, Standards Department, IEEE: Recommended Practice for Architectural Description of Software Intensive Systems. Technical Report IEEE P1471-2000, The Architecture Working Group of the Software Engineering Committee, Standards Department, IEEE, Piscataway, New Jersey, USA (2000), http://www.ieee.org ISBN 0-738-12518-0
  26. 26.
    Peirce, C.: Volumes I and II – Principles of Philosophy and Elements of Logic. Collected Papers of C.S. Peirce. Harvard University Press, Boston (1969) ISBN 0-674-13800-7Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Nonaka, I., Takeuchi, H.: The knowledge-creating company. Harvard Business Review, 97–130 (1991)Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Franckson, M., Verhoef, T. (eds.): Managing Risks and Planning Deliveries. Information Services Procurement Library. ten Hagen & Stam, Den Haag, The Netherlands (1999) ISBN 9076304831Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Proper, H. (ed.): ISP for Large-scale Migrations. Information Services Procurement Library. ten Hagen & Stam, Den Haag, The Netherlands, EU (2001) ISBN 9076304882Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. B. A. Hoppenbrouwers
    • 1
  • H. A. Proper
    • 1
  • Th. P. van der Weide
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Computing and Information SciencesRadboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands, EU

Personalised recommendations