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A Dynamic, Data-Driven, Decision Support System for Emergency Medical Services

  • Mark Gaynor
  • Margo Seltzer
  • Steve Moulton
  • Jim Freedman
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3515)

Abstract

In crisis, decisions must be made in human perceptual timeframes under pressure to respond to dynamic uncertain conditions. To be effective management must have access to real time environmental data in a form that can be immediately understood and acted upon. The emerging computing model of Dynamic Data-Driven Application Systems (DDDAS) fits well in crisis situations where rapid decision-making is essential. We explore the value of a DDDAS (iRevive) in support of emergency medical treatment decisions in response to a crisis. This complex multi-layered dynamic environment both feeds and responds to an ever-changing stream of real-time data that enables coordinated decision-making by heterogeneous personnel across a wide geography at the same time. This complex multi-layered dynamic environment both feeds and responds to an ever-changing stream of real-time data that enables coordinated decision-making by heterogeneous personnel across a wide geography at the same time.

Keywords

Decision Support System Emergency Medical Service Situational Awareness Command Center Mass Casualty Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Gaynor
    • 1
  • Margo Seltzer
    • 2
  • Steve Moulton
    • 3
  • Jim Freedman
    • 1
  1. 1.School of ManagementBoston UniversityBoston
  2. 2.Division of Engineering and Applied SciencesHarvard University 
  3. 3.School of MedicineBoston UniversityBoston

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