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The GETA Sandals: A Footprint Location Tracking System

  • Kenji Okuda
  • Shun-yuan Yeh
  • Chon-in Wu
  • Keng-hao Chang
  • Hao-hua Chu
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3479)

Abstract

This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a footprint-based indoor location system on traditional Japanese GETA sandals. Our footprint location system can significantly reduce the amount of infrastructure required in the deployed environment. In its simplest form, a user simply has to put on the GETA sandals to track his/her locations without any setup or calibration efforts. This makes our footprint method easy for everywhere deployment. The footprint location system is based on the dead-reckoning method. It works by measuring and tracking the displacement vectors along a trial of footprints (each displacement vector is formed by drawing a line between each pair of footprints). The position of a user can be calculated by summing up the current and all previous displacement vectors. Additional benefits of the footprint based method are that it does not have problems found in existing indoor location systems, such as obstacles, multi-path effects, signal noises, signal interferences, and dead spots. However, the footprint based method has a problem of accumulative error over distance traveled. To address this issue, it is combined with a light RFID infrastructure to correct its positioning error over some long distance traveled.

Keywords

Displacement Vector Location System Local Coordinate System Global Coordinate System Orientation Sensor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenji Okuda
    • 1
  • Shun-yuan Yeh
    • 1
  • Chon-in Wu
    • 1
  • Keng-hao Chang
    • 1
  • Hao-hua Chu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, Institute of Networking and MultimediaNational Taiwan UniversityTaipeiTaiwan

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